English

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English

ENGL120W College Composition
(4 Credits)
IIn this course, students learn the fundamentals of writing a research paper by engaging in a semester-long research project that ends with the submission of a seven-to-eight-page documented research paper. This research paper represents the culmination of all the research they have done on the topic during the semester. The documentation style students use and for which they are assessed is MLA. Instructors may introduce other styles, but only as a means of comparison to reinforce a student’s command of MLA. Leading up to the final research paper, students engage in activities that relate to their research project: e.g. writing shorter essays, doing annotated bibliographies, evaluating sources, presenting material (to the class or in groups), working with peers, reading scholarly and other sources, and the like. Students must get a passing grade on the research paper to pass the course.

ENGL123 Writing about Literature
(3 Credits)
This course introduces students to literary analysis. Specifically, students learn and practice fundamental critical skills in literary analysis, skills enabling them to access and interpret literary works with confidence and intellectual resourcefulness. Students study the primary literary forms (narrative prose fiction, poetry, and drama), as well as others, and apply the skills they learn to make meaningful contributions to the works they study. Furthermore, students develop research-writing and critical-thinking skills.

ENGL211W Professional Writing
(3 Credits)
This course builds on the composition basics of ENGL120, College Composition. It differs, however, in that Professional Writing produces documents you use in everyday life: practical, employment correspondence such as analytical reports, office memos, business letters, resumes, proposals, and grants. We will also focus on the techniques of professional communication pertaining to instructional brochures, manuals, oral presentations, business email etiquette, interviewing and visual design. We will learn critical and creative thinking, organization, collaboration, research methods, ethics, proofreading, editing, cultural considerations in writing and the power of persuasion. (Prerequisite: ENGL120W)

ENGL213W Survey of Women's Literature
(3 Credits)
Although with increasing education for women, published women's writings became more common in the 19th century, British and American literature remained largely male dominated for decades to come. This survey course of literature by and about women will attempt to deal with this discrepancy. Emphasis is on changing voices and concerns of women as related in their writing. Students read, write about, and discuss representative samples of writing in the major traditions of women's literature written in English. The course includes essay and journal writing, as well as a community-based research project.

ENGL214W Children's Language and Literature
(3 Credits)
This course presents children's language and literature from a developmental perspective. Students examine various genres in order to choose appropriate literature for the developmental stages of children from birth through pre-adolescence. Students participate in a variety of language and literature activities, including research, critical observation, original projects, and story-hour presentations.

ENGL217W North Country Literature and the New England Tradition
3 Credits
Local literature is read in the context of the canon of New England literature. Students discuss, read, and write about the Yankee perspective as revealed in poetry, essays, stories, and novels by Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont writers.

ENGL220W Writing the Short Story
(3 Credits)
Beginning with a series of individualized exercises and readings, the student will proceed to develop, draft and revise at least one good short story. The class is conducted as a writing workshop in which each student is expected to produce three to five pages of writing each week.

ENGL224W The Short Story
(3 Credits)
Early modern and contemporary short stories are read closely and analyzed for theme, plot development, character study, and author's style, as well as for the literary and historical periods they represent.

ENGL225W Oral Communication
(3 Credits)
A basic course in public speaking emphasizes the act of speaking and the modes of oral presentation.

ENGL229W Media and Society
(3 Credits)
This course is designed as a general analysis of the media, what influences content, and how that content influences our decisions as a society. In turn we will examine what impact our role as consumers of information has on the media. This course will concentrate on news and information media outlets. However, our analysis will extend beyond the traditional media institutions to include a variety of information sources made possible by the Internet. This course will include an historical perspective as we look at how media outlets have changed and evolved from newspapers, to radio and television broadcasting, to the Internet.

ENGL230W Creative Writing Workshop
(3 Credits)
Techniques, practice, and feedback help access creative writing skills and develop an understanding of different creative writing genres through weekly writing, revision, and a final portfolio. Students compose a short story, five pieces of poetry, and two dramatic scenes. Focus is on characterization, plot, imagery, and theme.

ENGL233W Environmental Literature
(3 Credits)
This course is intended to introduce students to some of the classic works of American nature writing.  The course will involve extensive reading and writing.  Students will gather weekly to discuss the assigned readings.  Discussion topics will include how literature influences public opinion and awareness, how the American view of human nature has changed over time and various writing methods. We will also work towards developing our own skills in observation, reflection and writing about nature.

ENGL234W Exploring Culture through Literature
(3 Credits)
Literature creates imagined worlds where the meaning of human experience is explored in a way that leads us to reflect on our lives and the nature of humanity. Exploring the literature of cultures other than our own creates an opportunity to appreciate alternate views of the world and humanity both intellectually and emotionally while identifying universal human experiences. Students will read contemporary literary compositions from a variety of cultures including our own. We will analyze the literary structure and techniques employed by the writers, and explore the unique cultural identities and dilemmas they portray in their work. Throughout the course we will be comparing and contrasting the revelations of our reading to further our appreciation of how the human experience differs and how it is the same across cultures.

ENGL235W Advanced Research Writing
(4 Credits)
This course builds upon the fundamental research skills acquired in ENGL120W: College Composition. Students learn advanced research-writing techniques and effective rhetorical strategies to be used within disciplines and across the curriculum. Through analysis, evaluation, research, and persuasion, students become advanced academic research writers. Using peer-reviewed, scholarly journals, non-fiction texts, primary and secondary sources, and more, students develop advanced competence in the art of rhetoric and argumentation. Unlike ENGL120W, which teaches MLA, ENGL235W teaches APA, a documentation style required for many degree programs. This course is highly recommended for students interested in pursuing a bachelor’s degree.  (Prerequisite: ENGL120W)

ENGL243W The Graphic Novel
(3 Credits)
Graphic novels, also known as comic books or sequential art, have come a long way since the first issue of Superman. This relatively new form of literature has exploded in popularity and increases daily in its variety and substance. This course will explore several different kinds of graphic novels -- memoir, fantasy, social critiques, adaptations, etc. -- in an effort to understand how writers and illustrators weave words and images together to create meaning in unique ways that transcend traditional genres and harness new modes of expression. The students will thus broaden their knowledge and appreciation of graphic novels as we apply critical concepts to their study.

ENGL245W Survey of British Literature I: 700 CE - 1800 CE
(3 Credits)
This course will introduce students to the first ten centuries of literature in English (Old, Middle, and Early Modern English). Study will focus on the major authors and issues of English. Students will analyze the range of social and cultural perspectives represented in the periods of English literature.

ENGL246W Survey of American Literature
(3 Credits)
This course introduces students to American literature with emphasis on the post-Revolutionary period, although some pre-Revolutionary texts may be considered to provide a contextual framework for later works. It takes into account elements of fiction (e.g. theme, plot, character, symbol, style) and offers a critical vocabulary to discuss literature. Students read, analyze, and interpret the works of major American authors during this timeframe. They read closely and critically from a literary perspective, as well as for the range of social, historical, political, and cultural perspectives they represent.

ENGL250W Survey of British Literature II: 1800 CE - 21st CE
(3 Credits)
This course introduces students to British literature from the Romantic period up to contemporary British literature. It takes into account elements of fiction (e.g. theme, plot, character, symbol, style) and offers a critical vocabulary to discuss literature. Students read, analyze, and interpret the works of major British authors during this timeframe. They read closely and critically from a literary perspective, as well as for the range of social, historical, political, and cultural perspectives they represent.

ENGL255W Poetry: A Study of a Literary Form
(3 Credits)
This course studies a wide range of poetry, acquainting students with major poets and potentially minor ones, as well. It provides a strong basis for reading, understanding, and writing about poetry and poetic form. Students become acquainted with various types of poems, such as the lyric, the sonnet, the elegy, the ballad, and many more. Finally, the course gives students a language and vocabulary, as well as critical, theoretical, social, and historical contexts to read, analyze, and interpret poetry

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